Ice and Longboats: Ancient Music of Scandinavia | Delphian DCD34181

Ice and Longboats: Ancient Music of Scandinavia

£12.56

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Label: Delphian

Cat No: DCD34181

Format: CD

Number of Discs: 1

Release Date: 22nd July 2016

Contents

Artists

Ake Egevad
Jens Egevad
Ensemble Mare Balticum

Artists

Ake Egevad
Jens Egevad
Ensemble Mare Balticum

About

Scandinavia’s archaeologically known prehistory encompasses around twelve thousand years, culminating in the Viking period (c.800–1050AD). The Middle Ages then followed, around six hundred years later than in continental Europe – a late development due to the long period in which ice still covered Europe’s northern parts. Volume 2 in Delphian Records’ groundbreaking collaboration with the European Music Archaeology Project constructs a soundscape of these two periods, featuring both music improvised on Viking instruments, and notated songs and instrumental items from the early centuries of Christianity in Scandinavia.

Track listing:
1. Drømde mik en drøm (recorder)
2. Signals to the Aesir Gods
3. In the Village: musical pastimes
4. In the Village 2: evening
5. Mith hierthæ brendher
6. Sequentia: Lux illuxit
7. Cantio: Scribere proposui
8. Drømde mik en drøm (bells)
9. Ramus virens olivarum
10. Drømde mik en drøm (duet)
11. Drømde mik en drøm (harp)
12. Drømde mik en drøm (symphony)
13. Nobis est natus hodie – In natali Domini
14. Estampie ‘Ferro transecuit’
15. Estampie ‘Pax patrie’
16. Rondellus: Ad cantus laetitiae
17. Mith hierthæ brendher (instrumental)
18. Melody from Hultebro
19. The Warrior with his Lyre
20. Gethornslåt
21. Grímur á Miðalnesi
22. Jesus Christus nostra salus
23. Nobilis humilis
24. Gaudet mater ecclesia
25. Antiphona: Hostia grata Deo
26. Antiphona: Ferro transecuit
27. Improvisation on ‘Gaudet mater ecclesia’
28. Sancta Anna, moder Christ
29. Sequentia: Diem festum veneremur

Reviews

This meticulously researched album from Sweden’s Ensemble Mare Balticum imagines the instruments Vikings played and the voices they sang with, opening with an eerily plain little tune on medieval bone recorder and progressing through staunch ritual numbers for lyres and frame drums to lush polyphonic hymns in praise of early Scandinavian Christian saints. The instrumentals are pretty dry, but the singing of Ute Goedecke and Aino Lund Lavoipierre is gorgeous: two pure and fulsome voices, beautifully matched.  Kate Molleson
The Guardian 15 July 2016

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