Schumann - Complete Symphonic Works Vol.5 | Audite AUDITE97718

Schumann - Complete Symphonic Works Vol.5

£13.05

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Label: Audite

Cat No: AUDITE97718

Format: CD

Number of Discs: 1

Genre: Orchestral

Release Date: 18th March 2016

Contents

About

Schumann’s 'Konzertstücke' complement his solo concertos. Confined to one movement, they are more concentrated, more pointed in their characters and freer in the development of their ideas than their bigger siblings.

Patricia Kopatchinskaja puts her own stamp onto this compact genre. Corresponding to her performance of the Violin Concerto (on Vol. 4), she also interprets the 'Violin Fantasy' without any Romantic bias. She traces Schumann’s contrasts with a broad sound palette, clear sounds alternating with intensive vibrato, and virtuoso passages characterised by nimble agility. The Fantasy finds its expression in Kopatchinskaja’s free approach.

Alexander Lonquich’s performance of the two Konzertstücke for piano follows an individual, but nonetheless Romantic reading, favouring rich sounds and carefully controlled accentuation as a means of expression.

The covertly multi-movement Konzertstück for Four Horns reveals Schumann’s symphonic experience: he softens the boundaries of the symphony as a genre in the Classical-Romantic tradition.

The final volume of this Schumann edition will showcase the 'Zwickau' Symphony as well as the complete Overtures.

Reviews

No one would pretend any of these pieces burn with the same creative fire as the music of a decade earlier, but under Holliger’s questing and attentive guidance they demonstrate that the falling off in Schumann’s late works was not as abrupt as sometimes suggested. The work for four horns stands out, if only for the novelty of its scoring, and Holliger’s performance – with a fabulously secure quartet of soloists – luxuriates in the sonorities it generates, while in the two works with piano, the soloist Alexander Lonquich finds moments of poetic beauty in the lyrical interludes.  Andrew Clements
The Guardian 18 March 2016

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