The Da Vinci Sound | Warner 9029550696

The Da Vinci Sound

£11.25

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Label: Warner

Cat No: 9029550696

Format: CD

Number of Discs: 2

Release Date: 1st February 2019

Contents

Artists

Paul Elliott (tenor)
Martyn Hill (tenor)
Christopher Hogwood (organ)
Paul O’Dette (lute)
Konrad Ragossnig (lute)
Geoffrey Shaw (bass-baritone)
Hopkinson Smith (lute)
Hanni Widmer (organ)
Choir of King’s College Cambridge
Early Music Consort of London
Ensemble Gilles Binchois
The Hilliard Ensemble
The King’s Singers
Ricercare-Ensemble fur Alte Musik Zurich
Taverner Choir
Taverner Consort
Taverner Consort

Conductors

Paul Hillier
Philip Ledger
David Munrow
Andrew Parrott
Anthony Rooley
Dominique Vellard
David Willcocks

Works

Anonymous

La volta
Une foys avant que morir
Venise

Binchois, Gilles

Amours mercy de trespout non pooir
Triste plaisir et douloureuse joie

Despres, Josquin

Adieu mes amours
Ave Maria...Virgo Serena
El grillo
In te Domine speravi
La Deploration de Johannes Ockeghem
Scaramella va alla guerra

Dufay, Guillaume

Je me complains piteusement
Missa L'homme arme
» Gloria
» Kyrie

Encina, Juan del

Triste Espana sin ventura

Henry VIII, King of England

En vray amoure
Pastime with good company

Holborne, Anthony

The Fairie-round

Milano, Francesco

La spagna for 2 lutes
Recercate concertante

Ockeghem, Johannes

Ma bouche rit
Requiem
» Introitus
» Kyrie
Salve Regina

Palestrina, Giovanni Pierluigi da

Missa Papae Marcelli
» Agnus Dei II
» Kyrie
O Magnum Mysterium

Penalosa, Francisco de

Adoro te, Domine Jesu Christe
Inter vestibulum et altare

Susato, Tielman

Danserye (selection)
Danserye

Tallis, Thomas

Spem in alium (40-part motet)

Verdelot, Philippe

Ultimi mei suspiri

Artists

Paul Elliott (tenor)
Martyn Hill (tenor)
Christopher Hogwood (organ)
Paul O’Dette (lute)
Konrad Ragossnig (lute)
Geoffrey Shaw (bass-baritone)
Hopkinson Smith (lute)
Hanni Widmer (organ)
Choir of King’s College Cambridge
Early Music Consort of London
Ensemble Gilles Binchois
The Hilliard Ensemble
The King’s Singers
Ricercare-Ensemble fur Alte Musik Zurich
Taverner Choir
Taverner Consort
Taverner Consort

Conductors

Paul Hillier
Philip Ledger
David Munrow
Andrew Parrott
Anthony Rooley
Dominique Vellard
David Willcocks

About

He painted the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, observed nature with scientific understanding and helped mankind with his visionary ideas to advance towards a number of innovative technologies. Leonardo da Vinci was one of the most important polymaths of all time – and a man who lived at a time of tremendous upheaval. That is apparent from the music that surrounded him: on 39 tracks the double album The Da Vinci Sound captures the sound of the Renaissance – with masses and motets, with songs, dances and madrigals.

‘Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519), who painted the “Mona Lisa" and “The Last Supper”, was also a designer of ingenious devices, and intensely interested in music – especially with technical improvements to instruments, such as the first valve systems for wind instruments and the idea of an “endless bow” for stringed instruments. As always, Leonardo was way ahead of his time with such ideas, while the music of his era was marked more by an intellectual energy located between the sacred and secular, juxtaposing musical refinement of divine worship and courtly culture.

‘Musical developments in the years 1500 to 1600 were spearheaded by several generations of the “Franco-Flemish School”. Their historic contribution was the development of the art of polyphonic vocal composition featuring imitatory, that is to say canon-like part-writing. This method was employed in church in the motet genre to set sacred Latin verses, while in the royal palaces this form developed into the vernacular madrigal – a vocal genre based on love poetry or verse describing nature, often with an erotic undertone.

‘The best known of these Franco-Flemish composers, Guillaume Dufay, Gilles Binchois, Johannes Ockeghem and Josquin des Prez, all came from the old region of Burgundy between Lorraine, Luxembourg, France and Flanders. They all travelled widely to other European countries, sharing their art with colleagues.

‘England and the Papal See in Rome were both pivotal in this development. One sacred work that owes its genesis to those composers from the Netherlands and their desire to travel round Europe is the Mass for Pope Marcellus II written in 1562 by Giovanni Perluigi da Palestrina using precisely those Franco-Flemish techniques. In the secular field of music master composers such as Francesco da Milano and the Spaniard Juan del Encina applied the same techniques in works for the fashionable instrument of the day, the lute. Even members of the aristocracy and royalty were known to put pen to paper to compose music: King Henry VIII for example, famous for having two of his six wives beheaded, composed love songs for his court.

‘One technical innovation which Leonardo da Vinci would have considered very useful and which marked the first step towards mass distribution of music was the printing of sheet music using movable type, the counterpart to Johannes Gutenberg’s book-printing press, developed by the Venetian-by-choice Ottaviano dei Petrucci (1466–1539). As a result of this innovation, it was then possible to print masses, motets and madrigals and to distribute them widely, as well as to finally annotate and print a wealth of music that had been handed down through generations: dance music. Consequently,  the “sound” of the Leonardo era was enriched by many printed scores, making it the first really well researched period of classical music.’

– Oliver Buslau

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