Buxton Orr - Songs | Delphian DCD34175

Buxton Orr - Songs

£12.56

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Label: Delphian

Cat No: DCD34175

Format: CD

Number of Discs: 1

Genre: Vocal/Choral

Release Date: 24th February 2017

Contents

Artists

Nicky Spence (tenor)
Iain Burnside (piano)
Jordan Black (clarinet)
Nikita Naumov (double bass)
Members of the Edinburgh Quartet

Works

Orr, Buxton

Canzona for voice, clarinet and string trio
Songs of a Childhood
Ten Types of Hospital Visitor for voice and double bass
The Ballad of Mr & Mrs Discobbolos
The Painter's Mistress

Artists

Nicky Spence (tenor)
Iain Burnside (piano)
Jordan Black (clarinet)
Nikita Naumov (double bass)
Members of the Edinburgh Quartet

About

When Nicky Spence was first shown the score to ‘The Boy in the Train’, the last of Buxton Orr’s Songs of a Childhood, he was transported to the late 1980s – his own childhood in Scotland. ‘Something about Buxton’s sense of humour, excitement and honesty resonated with me,’ Spence says, ‘and fed my desire to discover more about his work. On contacting his widow, I was led to a treasure trove of unrecorded works for voice.’

Sometimes thrillingly complex and always beautiful, and given character and verve by Orr’s delightful setting of the Scots language, this rich body of work has finally found a worthy modern-day advocate. In his sensitive and intelligent curating of this programme, Spence has brought together artists from Delphian’s roster – pianist Iain Burnside and members of the Edinburgh Quartet enjoy themselves in music that is firmly ‘home ground’.

Reviews

Nicky Spence is the first singer to record a full disc of [Buxton Orr’s] songs and it’s a revelation. Imagine a gentler, quirkier Britten with dabblings in 12-tone technique and old Scots poems set to generous vocal lines and off-piste instrumentation (how about a duo for tenor and double bass?). It helps that these performances are so good. Pianist Iain Burnside and his colleagues bring out all the care and wit in the instrumental writing... Spence himself sounds terrific throughout – nimble, direct, deftly playful and expressive with the text.  Kate Molleson
The Guardian 2 March 2017

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