Tharaud plays Rachmaninov | Erato 9029595469

Tharaud plays Rachmaninov

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Label: Erato

Cat No: 9029595469

Format: CD

Number of Discs: 1

Release Date: 21st October 2016

Contents

Artists

Alexandre Tharaud (piano)
Sabine Devieilhe (soprano)
Aleksandar Madzar (piano)
Alexander Melnikov (piano)
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra

Conductor

Alexander Vedernikov

Works

Rachmaninov, Sergei

Morceaux de Fantasie, op.3
Piano Concerto no.2 in C minor, op.18
Pieces (2) in A major for piano 6 hands
Vocalise, op.34 no.14

Artists

Alexandre Tharaud (piano)
Sabine Devieilhe (soprano)
Aleksandar Madzar (piano)
Alexander Melnikov (piano)
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra

Conductor

Alexander Vedernikov

About

French pianist Alexandre Tharaud takes on the blockbuster ‘Rach 2’ Concerto in a thrilling performance with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and Russian maestro Alexander Vedernikov. It is coupled with more intimate Rachmaninov for piano six-hands (for which Alexandre is flanked by Alexander Melnikov and Aleksandar Madžar) and the icing on the cake: a sublime Vocalise in the original version for voice and piano, with pure-voiced French soprano Sabine Devieilhe.

Alexandre Tharaud’s recorded catalogue is large and eclectic, but this is the first time he has devoted an entire album to Russian repertoire – specifically to the music of Sergei Rachmaninov. “I was still quite young when I first played this concerto,” explains Tharaud. “I adored it … Rachmaninov’s virtuosity really appeals to young pianists. Today, of course I’m still enthralled by the concerto’s virtuosity, but now I’m more interested in its dark shadows: the sense of despair, of staring into the abyss. My interpretation of Rachmaninov has changed a lot over the years.”

Reviews

Another ‘Rach 2’ dropping on to the doormat makes the heart rather sink. Except…the pianist is the wonderfully gifted Alexandre Tharaud, and the orchestra is the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, and, let’s see, the conductor is the excellent Alexander Vedernikov. This might be special. So it proves. After the famous introductory bars – following the score rather than the composer’s recording – the sweeping first subject enters faster, thankfully, than Richter’s celebrated account but with the same majestic assurance. ... On the last page, Tharaud and Vedernikov decide to share the battle honours and storm home as equal partners to thrilling effect.  Jeremy Nicholas
Gramophone October 2016
Gramophone Editor's Choice

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