J S Bach - Mass in B minor | CPO 7778512

J S Bach - Mass in B minor

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Label: CPO

Cat No: 7778512

Format: SACD

Number of Discs: 2

Genre: Vocal/Choral

Release Date: 4th January 2016

Contents

Artists

Maria Keohane
Joanne Lunn
Alex Potter
Jan Kobow
Peter Harvey
Concerto Copenhagen

Conductor

Lars Ulrik Mortensen

Works

Bach, Johann Sebastian

Mass in B minor, BWV232

Artists

Maria Keohane
Joanne Lunn
Alex Potter
Jan Kobow
Peter Harvey
Concerto Copenhagen

Conductor

Lars Ulrik Mortensen

About

The Concerto Copenhagen, the leading Scandinavian ensemble for historical performance practice, is currently regarded worldwide as one of the most remarkable and imaginative orchestras in this field under its artistic director Lars Ulrik Mortensen. The orchestra’s vitality, sense of style, and communicative talent have become its trademarks.

Accordingly, we have decided to release Bach’s Mass in B minor on two SACDS (moreover, in quality surround sound) featuring this extraordinary ensemble and top-class soloists.

Reviews

To my mind, Mortensen’s special performance, which is full to the brim with insightful musicianship and has a refreshing avoidance of contrived formulas, comfortably joins Parrott (EMI), Junghänel and John Butt (Linn) as the finest examples of this kind of perspective on performing Bach’s monumental sacred masterpiece. [...]  The individual components are routinely marvellous, but Concerto Copenhagen produce something much more than the sum of its parts: one of the most profoundly captivating interpretations to have emerged recently. David Vickers
Gramophone March 2016
The sound world of Bach’s last great Mass has changed radically in recent decades; one-to-a-part performance practice is, as conductor Lars Ulrik Mortensen puts it, “changing our entire notion of Bach’s acoustic universe”. This bold claim is amply proven in an account of dazzling transparency, dance-like rhythms and utter clarity. Sometimes the balance seems not quite right, for example when organ continuo dominates, but some superb ensemble numbers pit voices against virtuosic instruments so each seems to outdo the other in joyous exuberance. The five soloists complement each other well, and the addition of just five extra singers is all that is needed to explode Bach’s universal vision into life.  Nicholas Kenyon
The Observer 8 May 2016
Radio 3 Building a Library First Choice Gramophone Editor's Choice

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