Kirill Kondrashin Edition (1937-1963) | Profil PH18046

Kirill Kondrashin Edition (1937-1963)

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Label: Profil

Cat No: PH18046

Format: CD

Number of Discs: 13

Release Date: 30th November 2018

Contents

Artists

David Oistrakh (violin)
Boris Simsky (violin)
Emil Gilels (piano)
Mstislav Rostropovich (cello)
Sviatoslav Richter (piano)
Yakov Zak (piano)
Leonid Kogan (violin)
Victor Pikaizen (violin)
Vitaly Gromadsky (bass)
Male Bass Choir of the A. Yurlov Republican Russian Choir Capella
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
USSR Symphony Orchestra
Staatskapelle Dresden
Moscow Youth Symphony Orchestra
RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra
Moscow Youth Orchestra
Leningrad Symphony Orchestra
Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
Soloists, Chorus & Orchestra of the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow
Orchestra of the Mikhailovsky Opera Theatre, St Petersburg

Conductor

Kirill Kondrashin

Works

Casella, Alfredo

Paganiniana, op.65

Hindemith, Paul

Symphonic Metamorphosis on themes by Weber

Paganini, Nicolo

Violin Concerto no.1 in D major, op.6
» I Allegro maestoso

Rachmaninov, Sergei

Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, op.43
Symphonic Dances, op.45
Symphony no.3 in A minor, op.44

Ravel, Maurice

La Valse
Piano Concerto in D major for the left hand
Piano Concerto in G major
Rapsodie espagnole
Tzigane

Rimsky-Korsakov, Nikolai

Capriccio Espagnol, op.34
Piano Concerto in C sharp minor, op.30

Shchedrin, Rodion

Concerto for Orchestra no.1 'Naughty Limericks'

Shostakovich, Dmitri

Cello Concerto no.1 in E flat major, op.107
Symphony no.13 in B flat minor, op.113 'Babi-Yar'
Violin Concerto no.1 in A minor, op.99

Smetana, Bedrich

The Bartered Bride (Prodana nevesta)

Stravinsky, Igor

Violin Concerto in D major

Taneyev, Sergei

Suite de Concert, op.28

Tchaikovsky, Pyotr Ilyich

Capriccio italien, op.45
Pezzo capriccioso in B minor, op.62
Piano Concerto no.1 in B flat minor, op.23
Serenade for strings in C major, op.48
Serenade melancholique in B flat minor, op.26
Suite no.3 in G major, op.55
Symphony no.6 in B minor, op.74 'Pathetique'
Violin Concerto in D major, op.35

Weinberg, Mieczyslaw

Symphony no.4 in A minor, op.61
Violin Concerto in G minor, op.67

Artists

David Oistrakh (violin)
Boris Simsky (violin)
Emil Gilels (piano)
Mstislav Rostropovich (cello)
Sviatoslav Richter (piano)
Yakov Zak (piano)
Leonid Kogan (violin)
Victor Pikaizen (violin)
Vitaly Gromadsky (bass)
Male Bass Choir of the A. Yurlov Republican Russian Choir Capella
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
USSR Symphony Orchestra
Staatskapelle Dresden
Moscow Youth Symphony Orchestra
RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra
Moscow Youth Orchestra
Leningrad Symphony Orchestra
Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
Soloists, Chorus & Orchestra of the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow
Orchestra of the Mikhailovsky Opera Theatre, St Petersburg

Conductor

Kirill Kondrashin

About

How much tragedy, drama, joy and fulfilment are concealed behind the dates that summarize a person’s life can only be known – if at all – can only be sensed, can only be imagined, by those that are very close to him. Autobiographical confessions or denials may help outsiders, but there are usually protective filters or defensive walls around the soul that obscure the view.

The fate of the Soviet conductor Kirill Petrovich Kondrashin is just such a case. It is to the memory of this great artist that this Edition is dedicated, documenting recordings from 1937 to 1963 that may not tell the whole tale of his artistic life, but do shed light upon important stages of it.

Kirill Petrovich Kondrashin was born in Moscow on 6 March 1914, just before the fateful start of the First Word War. Little Kirill grew up in a musical family: his Jewish mother was a violinist from Riga, his father played the viola. The boy’s piano lessons began at an early age. We know little of the family’s fortunes in the period after the Bolshevik Revolution, but the teenage Kondrashin was able to study music theory with Nikolay Zhilyoyev (1881-1938).The Russian composer, musicologist and educator had learnt his trade from Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov (1859-1935) and Sergey Taneyev (1856-1915) and was a strong formative influence on his talented pupil.

This is Kondrashin’s laconic summing-up of his “art of conducting”: “Ultimately conducting is simply about making one’s own intentions intelligible to a hundred musicians and letting them play their part in them.” How much tragedy, drama, joy or fulfilment lay behind that aspiration was known only to Kirill Kondrashin himself.

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