Tarik O’Regan - A Celestial Map of the Sky | NMC Recordings NMCD220

Tarik O’Regan - A Celestial Map of the Sky

£11.25

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Label: NMC Recordings

Cat No: NMCD220

Format: CD

Number of Discs: 1

Release Date: 24th February 2017

Contents

Artists

Halle Orchestra
Halle Youth Choir
Manchester Grammar School Choir

Conductors

Mark Elder
Jamie Phillips

Works

O'Regan, Tarik

A Celestial Map of the Sky
Chaabi
Fragments from Heart of Darkness
Latent Manifest
Rai

Artists

Halle Orchestra
Halle Youth Choir
Manchester Grammar School Choir

Conductors

Mark Elder
Jamie Phillips

About

Tarik O'Regan's title work A Celestial Map of the Sky, here performed by a children's choir with the Hallé, is a vibrant work with propulsive, syncopated rhythms contrasting darker moments of reflection. The work is inspired by two woodcuts engraved by German polymath Albrecht Dürer in 1510 that are amongst the oldest known printed European star charts of the northern and southern celestial hemispheres.

A deep-rooted interest in North African traditional music (Tarik's family are from Morocco and Algeria) shapes two of the orchestral works on this album. Raï and Chaâbi are not ethnographic studies but are influenced by Algerian folk music forms.

Latent Manifest is an ingenious expansion of a single gesture from a Bach sonata, magnified to create an entire universe of orchestral colour.

To close the album, Fragments from Heart of Darkness draws on the music from O'Regan's chamber opera Heart of Darkness, based on the novel of the same name by Joseph Conrad.

Reviews

O’Regan has taken his majestic, brooding score for Tom Phillips’s subtle retelling of the brutal Conrad story [Heart of Darkness] and made a suite for orchestra that glows with the same jewel-like warmth that pervades the title piece on this disc, A Celestial Map of the Sky. Bright young voices bring both energetic and ethereal life to the poetry of, among others, Whitman and Hopkins, describing Earth’s relation to the infinite heavens and movingly reminding us to look beyond the boundaries of this weary world.  Stephen Pritchard
The Observer 19 February 2017

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