Franz Schmidt - Variations on a Hussarís Song, Phantasiestuck, Chaconne | Capriccio C5274

Franz Schmidt - Variations on a Hussarís Song, Phantasiestuck, Chaconne

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Label: Capriccio

Cat No: C5274

Format: CD

Number of Discs: 1

Genre: Orchestral

Release Date: 12th August 2016

Contents

Artists

Jasminka Stancul (piano)
Deutsche Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz

Conductor

Alexander Rumpf

Works

Schmidt, Franz

Chaconne in D minor
Phantasiestuck in B flat major for piano and orchestra
Variations on a Hussar's Song

Artists

Jasminka Stancul (piano)
Deutsche Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz

Conductor

Alexander Rumpf

About

Franz Schmidt's exemplary organ works and his oratorio The Book with Seven Seals rank today among his major compositions. This recording, however, features some of the rarities, including the Fantasia for piano and orchestra in B flat major. The work is thought to have been written in 1899 and finds Schmidt anticipating material from his successful opera Notre Dame. Long considered lost, the premiŤre of the Fantasia took place more than a century after its composition, on 8 November 2013 in the Vienna Musikverein. Variation form always held a special appeal for Schmidt, either in the form of thematic elaborations or in that of his large-scale Chaconne. The work's 1931 orchestral version (an arrangement of the Chaconne for Organ in C sharp minor) received its premiŤre at a 1933 subscription concert given by the Vienna Philharmonic, conducted by Clemens Krauss. The distinguished conductor was also the dedicatee of the Variations on a Hussarís Song for orchestra, composed the same year as the orchestration of the Chaconne. It, too, was premiŤred in 1931 by the Vienna Philharmonic under Clemens Krauss, who then gave a subsequent performance at the Salzburg Festival that summer. The work was first heard in the USA in February 1932, performed by the New York Philharmonic under Bruno Walter.

Reviews

Itís the big-boned Chaconne, almost half an hour long, that is the most compelling piece here, conjuring an unexpectedly massive music structure out of what seems, at first, a rather unprepossessing theme.  Andrew Clements
The Guardian 19 August 2016

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